Blog

  1. The Awkwardness of Greetings

    A short antidote:

    A month or so ago, a group of friends and I took a road trip from Budapest to Timișoara, Romania for summer adventure. We explored the town, went swimming, ate interesting food and I only managed to have one embarrassing moment, a record of sorts for my normally uncomfortable life. The boyfriend of the woman we were staying with arrived to her apartment on our first morning there. None of the four of us (two women and two men) had met him before and he walked into the room and proceeded to shake the hand of my male friend on my right side and then he stuck out his hand again and without hesitation I reached out and shook it. I’d never met him before and in Canada everyone shakes everyone’s hands, we don’t kiss or hug anyone we meet.

    Seeing the shock and strange look on his face I realized he was not extending a greeting to me but to my other male friend on my left.

    Listed in:

    Posted by: wscfe-editor on January 12th, 2012 10:52 am / Continue Reading »

  2. Changing our religious language in the name of gender neutrality

    The next WSCF Europe Gender conference is “Communicating Gender” 24-28 October in Løgumkloster, Denmark. This is a very interesting topic and being part of the PrepCom I’ve thought a lot about it lately. We’ve crammed the conference with diverse angles on this topic.

    Looking for a headline in a Christian context a while ago I suggested using part of the Lords prayer: “the kingdom, the power and the glory”. But I was told that that was not an option because using the word “kingdom” is non-inclusive.The word “kingdom” has been an issue I have heard raised several times at WSCF events. In defence of using it, someone said, that somewhere a woman had been given the title of “king” so now it would be okay to use the words “king” and “kingdom” because the word was moving towards gender neutrality. But to problematise talk of “Christ the King” and his “kingdom” seems strange to me. Jesus was human and he was a man. A male monarch is called a “king” and the scope of his rule is a “kingdom”. I agree that this term is not gender inclusive. A female monarch, a queen, can rule a kingdom (like Queen Elisabeth in the United Kingdom) but the word “kingdom” takes for granted, that the ruler is male – a “king”.

    Listed in:

    Posted by: wscfe-editor on January 12th, 2012 10:52 am / Continue Reading »

  3. Heartbeat Youth Congress + Kirchentag


    Dresden. old. new. eastern. shadows of WW2. hope. youth.

    From 31st May til 5th June about 60 young people from Central and Eastern Europe shared each others presence in Dresden, Germany.

    What was going on?

    “Heartbeat” Youth Congress preceeding a big socially-, politically- and spiritually-shaped German Protestant Kirchentag 2011. The topic was a challenging question: “What does my heart beat for?” and directly linked to the main theme of Kirchentag – “…there your heart will be also”, taken from the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 6:21).

    So, how did we explore what the heart beats for?

    Listed in:

    Posted by: wscfe-editor on January 12th, 2012 10:52 am / Continue Reading »

  4. Third African University on Youth Development: Day Six

    Friday is the last day of the official program. We’ve started with the debriefing the previous activities, mainly the ‘Volunteering Citizenship and Social Action DAY’. Marcus Andrade from the North-South Centre has underlined the importance of leaving ‘the safe space’ and mingling with the local people. Than we divided into 4 groups to share our ideas. The main concern was the sensitivity to the local context while visiting the sites. Some of us felt as if we were touching the reality in a very limited way or even invaded it.

    Listed in:

    Posted by: wscfe-editor on January 12th, 2012 11:43 am / Continue Reading »

  5. Third African University on Youth Development: Day Five

    The fifth day of the event was entitled ‘Volunteering Citizenship and Social Action DAY’. Well, you can expect different things and the schedule was kept secret till the very last moment. In the morning we walked to Santa Maria to visit the local primary school. During the meeting with the head teacher we had a chance to ask questions related to the educational dimension of the life at the Islands as well as see the school facilities.

    After that came the time for the action. Divided into three groups we some of us went campaigning for the health issues and the rest remained at school to prepare murals. My group was working with the topic of global education and interculturalism. The other one featured a stunning environmentally-engaged mural set in the local context. The act of creation per se would not have been that fascinating if there were no children eager to help. Suddenly the linguistic problems disappeared and altogether we became artists.

    Listed in:

    Posted by: wscfe-editor on January 12th, 2012 11:44 am / Continue Reading »

  6. Third African University on Youth Development: Day Four

    The day of thinking – at least this is how it seems after the first two sessions. We divided ourselves in 4 groups to explore the areas we find the most related to the activities our organizations are working on. Since the global campaign of WSCF is entitled Water Justice Now I thought that it would be reasonable to join the ‘environmentalists’.

    In a group of seven we were talking about the possibilities to increase the youth capacity in the area of the climate change. The project we were discussing includes global activities that address raising awareness as well as climate justice. For now we are drafting a possible strategic plan and look for possibilities of fundraising or joining another program that has similar objectives. In the afternoon, during the plenary session the project will be evaluated by the other participants and trainers. Looking forward to hearing the comments!

    Listed in:

    Posted by: wscfe-editor on January 12th, 2012 11:44 am / Continue Reading »

  7. Third African University on Youth Development: Day Three

    The formal approach to the youth work begins – we have identified the goals, benefits and key elements of the theme.  In the afternoon we had a chance to see a bit of Santa Maria – the closest town to the resort. The workshops organized by the participants were held in a local library to give us an insight into the local conditions. Thanks to an extremely various background we come from it was possible to approach issues such as advocacy, communication, strategic planning and monitoring from the different angles. As always the time was tight and the problems that were not possible to present during the workshop, were analyzed in a more informal way while walking along the beach.

    Listed in:

    Posted by: wscfe-editor on January 12th, 2012 11:44 am / Continue Reading »

  8. Third African University on Youth Development: Day Two

    The day after the intercultural night. The African dances and the smell of Swiss chocolate is still with us, but we are starting with the process of mapping global youth work and structures. Maqueto Lopes representing Pan African Youth Union presented the African perspectives for the youth work, Rui Duarte from the European Youth Forum stressed the importance of the civil society in the global youth work and finally Camelia Nistor from the Advisory Council on Youth of the Council of Europe.

    Listed in:

    Posted by: wscfe-editor on January 12th, 2012 11:44 am / Continue Reading »

  9. Third African University on Youth Development: Day One

    Let’s begin. More than 30 young people from all over the world came to a little island that for most of us did not have a clue of. After a long journey we arrived to an earthly paradise to explore our backgrounds, to create spaces for discussion, to imagine, to create and to share.

    The first grasps of the Capeverdian air, the touch of the equatorial sun and the local music all around – this makes me think that it is not going to be just another training course…

    Listed in:

    Posted by: nottheadmin on September 28th, 2011 11:44 am / Continue Reading »

World Student Christian Federation – Europe
Piazza di Centa 9
38122, Trento, Italy
+39 329 2099274 IBAN: IT85T0503401801000000000417 BIC: BAPPIT21179
Subscribe using RSS

Disclaimer

The work of WSCF-Europe is financially supported by the Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union and European Youth Foundation of the Council of Europe.

This website reflects the views only of the author, and the donors cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.